Orthopedic Treatment For Torn Meniscus

by Administrator 24. August 2015 10:01

Torn meniscus is one of the most common knee injuries seen in sportspersons. The meniscus is a C-shaped cartilage that sits between the thighbone and shinbone on either side of the knee. It provides cushioning to the knee bones and helps to keep the joint stable. Activities that require frequently twisting or rotating the knee joint, particularly with the leg planted, may cause the meniscus to tear.

Causes

  • Forceful twisting or rotating of the knee
  • Sudden stops and turns when the knee is bent
  • Repetitive kneeling, pivoting or squatting
  • Injuries during contact sports
  • Lifting weights improperly
  • Age related degeneration of the cartilage

Symptoms

  • Pain in and around the knee
  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Limited range of motion
  • Popping sensation at the time of injury
  • Buckling or locking of the knee, particularly during physical activity
  • Feeling that the knee may give away
  • Pain increases while running, walking or climbing stairs
  • Difficulty bending or straightening the leg

Diagnosis

To diagnose a torn meniscus, the orthopedic surgeon may move the affected knee and leg into different positions to identify the exact location of pain. He may also conduct certain imaging tests to rule out a fracture and evaluate the extent of damage caused to the cartilage.

Treatment

  • RICE Therapy: The patient may be advised to follow the RICE therapy for a few days following the injury. This includes taking proper rest and avoiding activities that may strain the knee, applying ice pack at the site of injury, compressing the knee with an elastic bandage and keeping the leg elevated above heart level. This will help to compress swelling and provide relief from pain.
  • Medications: The knee surgeon may prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to ease pain and discomfort associated with a torn meniscus.
  • Physical Therapy: Once the pain and swelling subside, the knee surgeon may suggest you to attend physical therapy sessions. Performing light exercises will help to strengthen the leg muscles to provide better support and stability to the knee joint.
  • Surgery: If the symptoms do not subside with conservative treatment, the doctor may recommend surgery. During the procedure, the knee surgeon may stitch the torn meniscal edges together or trim away the damaged part of the cartilage. 

The knee surgeons at OrthoTexas, Frisco provide effective treatment for torn meniscus and other knee injuries. To schedule an appointment, you can call us at (214) 618 – 5502 or visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034.

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Knee Osteonecrosis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 11. June 2015 10:41

Knee Osteonecrosis, also known as Avascular Necrosis of the knee, is the condition when a segment of the bone begins to die due to lack of blood supply. An injury to the bone or dislocation of the joint can affect the blood supply to the bone. The condition can cause the bone to collapse and cause cracks in it. Knee Osteonecrosis can affect anyone but people from the age group of 30-60 years are more prone to it.

Causes

  • Trauma: Forceful injuries, which can cause trauma to the bone, can affect blood circulation around the joint. Stress fractures combined with an activity of excessive force can also alter blood supply.
  • Effect on blood vessels: Fatty deposits, known as lipids, around small blood vessels can block them and reduce blood supply. Fluid built up inside the bone can put pressure on the blood vessels around it and reduce blood supply. 
  • Diseases: Lupus, Sickle Cell Anemia and Gaucher's Disease may affect the supply of blood to the bone.
  • Other conditions: Obesity and kidney transplants can also cause diminished blood supply to the bone.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the knee
  • Swelling
  • Limited motion
  • Increased pain with activity
  • Sensitivity around the joint
  • Severe pain during specific activities
  • Stiffness
  • Crunching sensation
  • Locking in the joint

Diagnosis

The orthopedic doctor usually diagnoses Knee Osteonecrosis by physical examination. The doctor may press around the joint to examine tenderness and ask to move the joint in certain positions to check the extent of pain. He may also ask the patient about his medical history and the nature of the injury that lead to the onset of symptoms. Certain imaging tests like X-ray, MRI scan or CT scan can be suggested to diagnose the severity of the condition.

Treatment

  • Medication: The doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medication to minimize pain and tenderness in the joint.
  • Immobilization: The patient may be recommended to limit movement of the knee by wearing braces. He can also be advised to avoid putting weight on the joint to speed up the healing process.
  • Exercises: Certain physical therapy and stretching exercises may help in improving blood circulation in the joint and regaining movement.
  • Lifestyle changes: People with jobs that include excessive walking, running, jumping, kneeling, squatting or any other activity, which may put pressure on the knee, are suggested to relax the joint and rest for a while.
  • Surgery: In severe cases, the doctor may recommend the patient to undergo surgery to regain movement in the knee and treat the condition.

 

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Torn ACL: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 9. February 2015 11:13

ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) injury is one of the most common knee injuries related to athletics and sports. The ACL is a tough ligament that is located in the center of the knee joint. It comes from back of the thighbone and connects to the front of the shinbone or tibia at a point called tibial spine.  The main function of the ACL is to control the movement of tibia under the femur. The ACL is torn if the tibia moves too far or when the knee is hyperextended. ACL injuries are more common among women athletes as compared to men and often the injury is so severe that the orthopedic surgeons have to reconstruct the torn ACL.

Causes

  • Suddenly stopping or slowing down
  • Changing directions rapidly while playing or running
  • Contact related injuries or trauma
  • Firmly planting the foot while playing football
  • Forceful twisting of knee
  • Direct blow to the front of the knee
  • Landing incorrectly after jump

Symptoms

  • Hearing pop sound when the ACL tears
  • Swelling
  • Inflammation
  • Intense pain
  • Instability
  • Knee slips back
  • Inability to walk
  • Difficult to straighten knee
  • Loss of full range of motion
  • Tenderness

Diagnosis

Discuss your symptoms with the orthopedic physician, who will ask you about your medical history. During physical examination, the physician examines the injured knee and compares it to the non-injured knee. The orthopedic physician recommends imaging tests to confirm the diagnosis. These tests include X-rays, MRI, CT Scan, etc.

Treatment

The torn ACL is treated both surgically and non-surgically. The physician may decide the line of treatment depending upon your personal condition and the severity of the injury. The orthopedic surgeon often recommends surgery for young athletes who wish to return to the sports and non-surgical treatment for older, less active individuals who can afford a sedentary lifestyle.

The non-surgical options include using braces to protect the knee from instability. You may be advised to use crunches to avoid putting weight on the leg. Once the swelling subsides, the physical therapist offers a carefully devised rehabilitation program, which includes specific exercises that strengthen the knee muscles. In case of surgical treatment, the orthopedic surgeon rebuilds the ligament and restores the knee stability. The surgeon reconstructs the ligament using a tissue graft and the re-growth often takes up to six months or more.

For more information, visit OrthoTexas, Frisco. To schdeule an appointment, visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034 or call (214) 618-5502.

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